Mirror of Justice

A blog dedicated to the development of Catholic legal theory.

Monday, December 3, 2018

Sofia Carozza on Advent, neuroscience, and "Locke's Lonely Liberalism"

Sofia Carozza, a neuroscience-and-theology major at Notre Dame, has this very interesting reflection in the Church Life Journal on Advent, neuroscience, and "Locke's Lonely Liberalism."  Just a bit:

. . . Neuroscience alone shows us that our development and flourishing takes place through relationships of love. But in providing a corrective to Locke, developmental neuroscience is well supplemented by a Thomistic account of the human person. Such an account is particularly helpful when the development of the virtues is understood through the interpretive key of “second-person relatedness.”[9] This Thomistic concept, as argued by Andrew Pinset, is the idea that the “I” is formed in dialogue with the “you,” in an irreducible dialectical relationship. Second-person relatedness begins between the child and her parents, a relationship in which she starts to develop the human virtues and gain agency as a moral individual. However, Pinset argues that second-person relatedness is a continuum of relationship that extends even to the child’s connection with God. Through this divine I-Thou relationship, she experiences friendship with God and is thus bestowed the theological virtues.

This account of the human person accords well with neuroscience research. . . .

https://mirrorofjustice.blogs.com/mirrorofjustice/2018/12/sofia-carozza-on-advent-neuroscience-and-lockes-lonely-liberalism.html

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