Mirror of Justice

A blog dedicated to the development of Catholic legal theory.
Affiliated with the Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Chesterfield County, Va. switches from invited clergy to legislators' own prayers

This news is a few days old, but I thought it appropriate anyhow to follow up on my prior post about the post-Town of Greece legislative prayer practice of Chesterfield County, Virginia.

The Board of Supervisors has changed its legislative prayer policy. Starting next year, the supervisors will rotate among themselves in delivering an invocation or presiding over a moment of silence. This is a shift away from a practice of inviting ordained clergy of monotheistic religions, which some contended was unconstitutional under a perceived non-discrimination requirement in the Supreme Court's decision in Town of Greece v. Galloway.

The shift is prudent even if not constitutionally required, and it may be that the supervisors were closer in thinking to Josh Blackman's assessment of Town of Greece than to mine. The decision may also reflect the reality that the County would be on the hook for plaintiffs' attorneys' fees and costs if the County litigated and lost, but the County could not recover it own fees and costs if the County litigated and won.

https://mirrorofjustice.blogs.com/mirrorofjustice/2014/07/chesterfield-county-va-switches-from-invited-clergy-to-legislators-own-prayers.html

Walsh, Kevin | Permalink