Mirror of Justice

A blog dedicated to the development of Catholic legal theory.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Civility and the pursuit of justice

Lest we grow complacent in attributing the degrading of our political culture solely to Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton steps forward to remind us that the race to the bottom is readily susceptible to a bipartisan effort. In a recent interview, she explained, "You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about. That's why I believe, if we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that's when civility can start again."

Her comments reflect a fundamental misunderstanding of civility's role in the pursuit of justice.  As I explained earlier this week in an op-ed,

The means we employ in the political pursuit of our chosen values and priorities bear witness to how we view our fellow Americans.

As [Martin Luther King Jr.] reminded us during the tumult of the civil rights movement, “Hate is always tragic. It is as injurious to the hater as it is to the hated. It distorts the personality and scars the soul.”

That prison cells, firebombs and police dogs could not shake King from his commitment to civility speaks volumes about its importance to his work — and to ours.

Here is the lesson for Americans today who seek to defend their cherished values and priorities in the public square: Civility is not ultimately about manners; it’s about affirming our shared dignity and acknowledging — albeit sometimes through gritted teeth — that politics calls us to relationship.

When we allow our disagreements to obscure the dignity of our political opponents, we’re forgetting why King thought such battles were worth fighting in the first place.

You can read the whole thing here.

October 11, 2018 in Vischer, Rob | Permalink

Sunday, October 7, 2018

"China's Crackdown on Christianity"

Story here.  Very troubling.  A bit:

China’s crackdown on religion has taken a significant turn over the last two months, reaching a sustained intensity not seen since the Cultural Revolution. Outside the Three-Self Patriotic Movement churches—the state-sanctioned Christian churches—Christians have been facing steadily increasing pressure for the last 10 years. In 2017, the crosses of hundreds of churches were removed in Zhejiang Province. Cameras and other monitoring devices were also installed in churches throughout the province.

The situation is not isolated to Christians. Authorities in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region have been working to develop and implement a massive electronic surveillance system straight out of Nineteen Eighty-Four, including facial and iris recognition, speech recognition software, and even DNA sampling. Chinese authorities have also instituted a reeducation program, detaining Uighurs in “reeducation camps” and even luring Uighur students studying abroad to return to China under false pretenses, only to be detained.

October 7, 2018 in Garnett, Rick | Permalink

Some G.K. Chesterton for today . . .

Re-read "Lepanto," and thank Don Juan (and the Holy Rosary!).

October 7, 2018 in Garnett, Rick | Permalink

Our Lady, the Holy Rosary, and Lepanto

Lepanto

October 7, 2018 in Garnett, Rick | Permalink

Friday, October 5, 2018

 
 
Remembering Rev. Robert J. Araujo, S.J.:
Priest, Lawyer, and Scholar
 
 
Thursday, November 8, 2018
5:30 p.m.
 
Loyola University Chicago School of Law
Power Rogers & Smith Ceremonial Courtroom, 10th Floor
25 E. Pearson Street, Chicago
 
Rev. Robert J. Araujo, S.J. was a beloved member of the School of Law faculty and the inaugural holder of the John Courtney Murray, S.J. University Professorship. He was a dedicated teacher, a devoted priest, and a good friend to many at Loyola. 
 
Father Araujo received both his BA and his JD from Georgetown University. He later continued his legal studies at Columbia University where he received both an LLM and an SJD.  He also earned degrees from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology (MDiv and STL) and Oxford University (BCL). An accomplished scholar, Father Araujo was the author of several books and numerous articles on natural law philosophy, statutory interpretation, international law, and Jesuit education.
 

In addition to holding various teaching positions at Loyola University Chicago, Gonzaga University, St. Louis University, Fordham University, and Boston College, he also served as Permanent Observer and Attaché and Legal Observer for the Holy See to the United Nations.

 

Father Araujo passed away
in October 2015. To honor his memory, a number of his friends and former colleagues prepared a collection of essays that have now been published as a book, Priests, Lawyers, and Scholars (Franciscan Univ. Press 2018). 

Please join us for a panel discussion to celebrate Father Araujo's life and the publication of the book.  

Panelists
Ronald J. Rychlak, Jamie L. Whitten Chair of Law and Government and Professor of Law, University of Mississippi

Elizabeth Schiltz, Co-Director of the Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy, Herrick Professor of Law and Thomas J. Abood Research Scholar,  University of St. Thomas

David DeWolf, Professor Emeritus, Gonzaga University School of Law

Stefanus Hendrianto, S.J., Society of Jesus (West), book contributor and editor

A reception will follow the discussion. The event is free and open to the public.  
Registration is requested.
 
 
RSVP
 

October 5, 2018 | Permalink